Carrie “Too little, too late” Lam should go… #HongKong #HongKongProtest

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As Hong Kong Protesters Push On, No Sign of More Concessions by Government

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By Amy Qin and 

HONG KONG — A day after Hong Kong’s leader said she would withdraw the extradition bill that set off months of protests, she gave no sign on Thursday that more concessions would be forthcoming, even as dissatisfied protesters planned to hold more demonstrations.

The city’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, said she was optimistic that pulling the bill, along with other measures she offered on Wednesday, would help Hong Kong break its “impasse.” At a news conference, she called on peaceful demonstrators not to legitimize “the really violent protesters,” in what some saw as an attempt to divide the movement.

But there was little evidence that withdrawing the bill, which would have allowed extradition to mainland China, would satisfy even the more moderate demonstrators. Since the protests began in June, the demonstrators’ demands have broadened to include political reforms and an independent investigation of the police, whose use of violence in response to the protests has angered many in the city.

“I don’t accept this,” said Karen Poon, 31, a social worker who counts herself among the moderate demonstrators. “Anyone who has committed crimes, neglected their duty and abused their power throughout this incident should be punished by law, in order to uphold real justice.”

Ms. Poon added: “What everyone is defending now is not only the anti-extradition cause, but also the universal values of love and justice.”

Withdrawing the extradition bill had been widely seen as the easiest step the government could take to appease the protesters. The bill — which many Hong Kongers feared could expose people in the semiautonomous city to mainland China’s opaque judicial system — had already been suspended, but until Wednesday, Mrs. Lam had refused to formally withdraw it.

She suggested on Wednesday that democratic reforms could eventually be a possibility, under the right circumstances. But she dismissed the protesters’ other demands. She did not address them on Thursday, instead promising to establish a “dialogue platform” to address the city’s troubles.

Demonstrators said they would carry on with protests that had been scheduled for this week, including plans to disrupt access to the airport on Saturday and to stage various small rallies. Plans for large-scale marches were also being discussed.

https://twitter.com/CNN/status/1169529865932029952?s=20

Hong Kong government’s attempt to outflank protesters is doomed to fail

Hong Kong (CNN)Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam announced Wednesday that she will finally withdraw the loathed extradition bill that kick-started three months of violent protests. The move was greeted not with the relief or happiness she might have hoped for, but with frustration and anger that the compromise had taken so long.
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Few expect the unrest to stop anytime soon. The government may hope to outflank the protest movement by painting them as unwilling to accept compromise, but even some of Lam’s allies have publicly said that the withdrawal was too little, too late.
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Lam has walked right up to the line of an effective solution and stopped just short, just as she did in June when she suspended the bill instead of withdrawing it.
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Had she announced an independent investigation into allegations of police brutality — thus fulfilling the two most important of the protests’ five demands — she might have taken the wind out of the movement. Instead, she continues to insist the matter be handled by the Independent Police Complaints Council (IPCC), which despite its name has been criticized as stacked with government loyalists and lacks the confidence of protesters.
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Speaking Wednesday, Michael Tien, a moderate pro-Beijing lawmaker, urged the government to set up an independent inquiry, which was “absolutely necessary to quell the conflicts and for Hong Kong to heal.”
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“I absolutely believe an independent inquiry is of utmost importance,” he said. “The withdrawal of the bill … may be too late because this movement has become more than the bill.”
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Starry Lee, leader of the largest pro-Beijing party, said of Lam’s withdrawal: “We think it’s late, but it’s important for someone to take the first step. Whether this will stop the movement, it depends on the society.”

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