Malaysian scammed insurance companies in Singapore: How stupid can you get?

18 November 2015

In 2012-2014, Malaysian Tew Yee Jeng, 40, crossed over to Singapore and arranged scam traffic accidents to make insurance claims for property damage and bodily injuries.

He could have done it anywhere in Malaysia and would have got away with it. Why did he do that in Singapore?

He will be sentenced on 19 November 2015.

Man convicted of orchestrating traffic accidents to claim insurance

Man convicted of orchestrating traffic accidents to claim insurance

Embedded image permalink

SINGAPORE — Rounding up accomplices desperate to absolve themselves from debts and financial hardship, Tew Yee Jeng, a 40-year-old Malaysian, made several trips to Singapore between 2012 and 2014, where he would orchestrate scam traffic accidents to make insurance claims for property damage and bodily injuries.

The drivers he recruited would abruptly slam their brakes on purpose, leading to collisions with vehicles behind them that could not be stopped in time to prevent a crash.

Using this modus operandi, Tew and his accomplices submitted almost S$105,000 in motor insurance claims, and about S$18,300 was disbursed to them in 2012.

Yesterday, Tew was convicted of three counts of abetment by conspiracy to cheat, one count of abetment by conspiracy to provide false information to a public servant, and one count of reckless driving.

Tew, who will be sentenced tomorrow, faces up to 10 years’ jail and a fine for each charge of abetment by conspiracy to cheat, and one year’s jail and a fine of up to S$5,000 for abetment to provide false information to a public servant.

On one occasion on July 3 last year, Tew and three accomplices — Goh Hua Loon, Jonathan Tan, and Yew Yun Xiang — were cruising around the Woodlands area in two cars when Tew spotted a heavy vehicle as a “suitable unsuspecting rear vehicle”.

As planned, the sudden halt caused the heavy vehicle to collide into the rear of Goh’s vehicle. Yew and Tan left Singapore on the night of the incident while a claim of S$54,710 was submitted to AXA Insurance Singapore for damages to Goh’s vehicle.

The court heard that Tew had also engineered similar schemes in January, April and July 2012. Tew’s ploys came to light when an executive at AXA engaged a surveyor to assess the matter.

On July 31 last year, Goh — who was roped into the scam after he confided in Tew about his financial difficulties — admitted to the surveyor that the collision was intentional. AXA then lodged a police report.

http://www.todayonline.com/singapore/man-convicted-orchestrating-traffic-accidents-claim-insurance

OTHERS BEFORE THIS HAD BEEN FOUND OUT AND SENT TO JAIL.

The Straits Times

Phantom driver jailed three months in motor insurance scam

Court Correspondent

SINGAPORE – An unemployed man who took part in a motor insurance scam was jailed for three months on Thursday.

Tan Eng Chui, 43, pleaded guilty to conspiring with Pan Weida Pepin, 31, Su Chia Ern, 44, and Godfrey Liew Kok Hon, 39, to cheat insurance companies on or before April 22, 2009.

Court documents show that he submitted a Singapore Accident Statement on April 23 that year claiming that he was driving a car the previous day when it was involved in an accident with another car along Upper Thomson Road.

He did this to deceive his vehicle insurer NTUC Income into believing that the accident was genuine, and induced NTUC to pay $1,400 to Concept Services Enterprise as payment for a first party property damage claim.

http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/courts-crime/phantom-driver-jailed-three-months-in-motor-insurance-scam

 

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s