Can mouthwash protect us from Covid-19? Yes, but mouth rinses are not suitable for treating Covid-19 infections or protecting yourself against catching the virus…

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Mouth rinses are not suitable for treating Covid-19 infections or protecting yourself against catching the virus.

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Sars-Cov-2 viruses can be inactivated using certain commercially available mouthwashes. This was demonstrated in cell culture experiments by virologists from Ruhr-Universität Bochum together with colleagues from Jena, Ulm, Duisburg-Essen, Nuremberg and Bremen. High viral loads can be detected in the oral cavity and throat of some Covid-19 patients. The use of mouthwashes that are effective against Sars-Cov-2 could thus help to reduce the viral load and possibly the risk of coronavirus transmission over the short term. This could be useful, for example, prior to dental treatments. However, mouth rinses are not suitable for treating Covid-19 infections or protecting yourself against catching the virus.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/08/200810103239.htm

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ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT

Virucidal efficacy of different oral rinses against SARS-CoV-2 

Toni Luise MeisterYannick BrüggemannDaniel TodtCarina ConzelmannJanis A MüllerRüdiger GroßJan MünchAdalbert KrawczykJörg SteinmannJochen Steinmann… Show moreAuthor NotesThe Journal of Infectious Diseases, jiaa471, https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiaa471Published: 29 July 2020 Article history 

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Abstract

The ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic creates a significant threat to global health. Recent studies suggested the significance of throat and salivary glands as major sites of virus replication and transmission during early COVID-19 thus advocating application of oral antiseptics. However, the antiviral efficacy of oral rinsing solutions against SARS-CoV-2 has not been examined. Here, we evaluated the virucidal activity of different available oral rinses against SARS-CoV-2 under conditions mimicking nasopharyngeal secretions. Several formulations with significant SARS-CoV-2 inactivating properties in vitro support the idea that oral rinsing might reduce the viral load of saliva and could thus lower the transmission of SARS-CoV-2.

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Author notes

equally corresponding authors© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

https://academic.oup.com/jid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/infdis/jiaa471/5878067

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Sars-Cov-2 viruses can be inactivated using certain commercially available mouthwashes. This was demonstrated in cell culture experiments by virologists from Ruhr-Universität Bochum together with colleagues from Jena, Ulm, Duisburg-Essen, Nuremberg and Bremen. High viral loads can be detected in the oral cavity and throat of some Covid-19 patients. The use of mouthwashes that are effective against Sars-Cov-2 could thus help to reduce the viral load and possibly the risk of coronavirus transmission over the short term. This could be useful, for example, prior to dental treatments. However, mouth rinses are not suitable for treating Covid-19 infections or protecting yourself against catching the virus.

The results of the study are described by the team headed by Toni Meister, Professor Stephanie Pfänder and Professor Eike Steinmann from the Bochum-based Molecular and Medical Virology research group in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, published online on 29 July 2020. A review of laboratory results in clinical trials is pending.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20200810/Mouthwashes-could-lower-the-transmission-of-SARS-CoV-2.aspx

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