The Strait of Malacca Bridge: A bridge too far?

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THE PROPOSED STRAIT OF MALACCA BRIDGE

It will be 127.92km in length and link Dumai in the Sumatran province of Riau and Malacca.

The Strait of Malacca bridge project connecting Teluk Gong in Malacca and Dumai in Indonesia. Source: Strait of Malacca Partners Sdn Bhd.

The Strait of Malacca bridge project connecting Teluk Gong in Malacca and Dumai in Indonesia. Source: Strait of Malacca Partners Sdn Bhd.


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Free Malaysia Today

Bridge over busy waters

October 21, 2013

The proposal to build a bridge across the Straits of Malacca will have significant impacts on the shipping, environment and trade dynamics in the sea lane.

Comment

By Dr Ibrahim Mohamed, Mohd Nizam Basiron, Nazery Khalid & Capt. Rakish Suppiah

The recent announcement by a little-known group called the Straits of Malacca Partners Sdn Bhd to build a project to build a RM44 billion bridge linking Peninsular Malaysia and Sumatra has set the maritime community abuzz.

Shipping

It is certain that the construction of the bridge would hamper the safe movement of ships in the Straits. Traffic flow in the Straits, one of the world’s busiest sealanes, would be adversely affected.

It is expected that and the presence of the bridge would present an obstacle for the smooth flow of shipping traffic in the narrow waterway.

Environment

…there is no doubt that such a massive project would adversely affect the coastal ecosystems on both sides of the bridge, and its impact would be felt by the Straits as a whole.

On a larger scale, the project could change the hydrology of the Straits. The movement and speed of currents would be altered by the presence of pillars supporting the bridge, and could potentially alter the nature of the Straits.

Maritime trade and trade transport

The presence of the bridge would likely generate several impacts to maritime trade, ports, shipping traffic and infrastructure developments in and along the busy waterway. A project of this magnitude would surely alter the landscape of maritime trade in the surrounding areas and would reshape the dynamics of the economy in the area including shipping, port operations and other related activities.

Conclusion

A thorough and comprehensive study of the potential cost-benefit, legal, environmental, strategic and socio-economic impacts of the project needs to be conducted before any decision on such a colossal project is made.

Until then, the proposed bridge across the Straits of Malacca will remain a bridge too far.

http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/category/opinion/2013/10/21/bridge-over-busy-waters/

IT TAKES TWO TO TANGO. Malaysia is one, and Indonesia is the other, and the latter is not keen.

Malaysian Insider

Indonesia in no hurry to revive plans for Straits of Malacca bridge

BY TRINNA LEONG
October 19, 2013

The Indonesian government has said that it is not rushing to move ahead with the Straits of Malacca bridge project anytime soon and would first study the bridge’s prospects and benefits prior to making any final decisions.

“We understand that this project is important to strengthen connectivity across Asean, particularly between Indonesia and Malaysia. But, we have to be fully prepared in terms of infrastructure, safety and security before this bridge is constructed, as it will connect our country to the whole of Asia, not only Malaysia,” Public Works Ministry’s director-general Djoko Murjanto told The Jakarta Post yesterday.

“Our position is that we are not rushing this project; nor do we have it on hold. We have not yet seen any urgency for it,” Djoko said.

http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/indonesia-in-no-hurry-to-revive-plans-for-straits-of-malacca-bridge

Free Malaysia Today

Bridge to Dumai: Don’t jump (for joy) too soon

P Ramani | October 17, 2013

Malacca-Dumai Bridge project could increase the national debt level and a cost-benefit analysis should be done first, said CIMB chief economist Lee Heng Guie.

PETALING JAYA: The federal and Malacca state governments should consider the current economic situation and debt problem before undertaking the Malacca-Dumai bridge project across the Straits of Malacca, said CIMB chief economist Lee Heng Guie.

Lee said the government should conduct a thorough cost-benefit analysis before it carrying such a mega-project.

He said it would be an extra burden for the government to contain the increasing national debt because work on the Mass Rapid Transit project had already started.

The chief economist suggested revamping the public transportation system in the country before thinking of a bridge to connect Indonesia.

Meanwhile, the Maritime Institute of Malaysia (MIMA) in a published analysis in October 2009 stated that the construction of a bridge across the Straits would hamper the safe movement of ships and traffic flow.

“The presence of the bridge would present an obstacle for the smooth flow of shipping traffic in the narrow waterway.

“The construction and presence of the bridge would not only reduce the speed of ships transiting through the Straits but would also cause difficulty for large container vessels to navigate through,” said MIMA researchers in their analysis.

MIMA also said that the movement and speed of currents would be altered by the presence of pillars supporting the bridge, and could potentially alter the nature of the Straits.

In addition, a bridge over the Straits would also cause an impact to the seabed ecosystems of the areas.

Bridge to Dumai: Don’t jump (for joy) too soon

Star

Thursday October 17, 2013 MYT 6:42:19 AM

Malacca businessmen want say in bridge project discussions

MALACCA: The Malacca business community has urged the state government to include it in discussions on the proposed Malacca-Dumai Bridge project.

Malacca Chinese Chamber of Commerce and Industry chairman Tan Poh Seng said the government should convene a round-table discussion with local business leaders from all communities before reviving the multi-billion-ringgit pro­ject.

Tan said under current economic conditions, many locals were employed under minimal salaries and matters would worsen with an influx of foreigners via the bridge into the already saturated local job market.

“It would be easier for Indo­nesians to cross over here where some employers might prefer hiring them on lower pay scales.

“We have to evaluate whether the local business community will benefit or suffer from the project.

“Local tourists could also frequent the other side more often in search of cheaper products due to the exchange rate between the ringgit and the rupiah.

Tan said the government should also consider the security aspects of the project as the bridge would make it easier for foreigners to commit crime and escape in just hours.

Malacca businessmen want say in bridge project discussions

Star

Wednesday October 16, 2013 MYT 9:46:20 AM

Malacca revives straits bridge project

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Artist’s impression of the proposed Malacca-Dumai bridge.

MALACCA: The Malacca Government has revived the controversial 48.69km-long Malacca-Dumai, Indonesia, bridge project across the Straits of Malacca, after a seven-year lull.

Chief Minister Datuk Seri Idris Haron said finer details of the project linking Teluk Gong in Malacca in the peninsula to the port of Dumai, in Sumatra, would be revealed when all mechanisms were in place.

The project was discussed during the 10th Chief Ministers and Governors’ Forum (CMGF) of the Indonesia-Malaysia-Thailand Growth Triangle (IMT-GT) convened in Koh Samui, Thailand, on Sept 12.

Malacca revives straits bridge project

Malaysian Insider

Side Views

The proposed Strait of Malacca bridge: Linking or breaking the region? – Mohd Hazmi and Wan Izatul Asma

September 24, 2013

Plans have been mooted to construct a bridge to link the Indonesian port-city of Dumai in the Sumatran province of Riau with Malacca. This bridge will obviously result to any of these two circumstances; linking or breaking the region.

The groundwork for the project started since 2006 and studies show that the bridge project is technically feasible. If the project is carried out, the bridge has been estimated to cost US$12.5 billion. The Import-Export Bank of China has agreed to finance 85% of the total cost of the bridge project.

This proposed 127.92km-long bridge is said to be capable of fostering new economic opportunities between the two countries particularly in stimulating trade and the tourism industry. Malaysia will undertake to build 48.68km of the bridge while Indonesia will construct the remaining 79.24km.

The proposed Strait of Malacca Bridge is likely to resemble the Oresund Bridge that connects the Danish capital of Copenhagen in Denmark and Malmo in Sweden.

For the full article, click on

http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/sideviews/article/the-proposed-strait-of-malacca-bridge-linking-or-breaking-the-region-mohd-h

Bridges across Critical International Shipping Ways – 法学期刊 – 北大

journal.chinalawinfo.com/Article_Info.asp?Id=165197

Hatten City

Melaka-Sumatera Bridge Awaits Approval

posted Apr 25, 2011, 9:24 AM by lester tan   [ updated Apr 25, 2011, 9:41 AM ] KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 18 (Bernama) — A project to build a bridge linking Melaka and Sumatera will proceed when approvals are given by the Malaysian and Indonesian governments, said Melaka Chief Minister Datuk Seri Mohd Ali Rustam.

The 52km bridge costing nearly US$12.5 billion (US$1 = RM3.54) will link Teluk Gong in Melaka to Dumai, Sumatera.

Mohd Ali said the project would take nine years to complete.

The chief minister however, hoped the two governments would soon give the approval to build the bridge.

He was speaking to reporters at the Straits of Malacca Bridge Project seminar organised by Strait of Malacca Partners Sdn Bhd here today.

The aim of the seminar was to explain to Malaysian and Indonesian representatives, the architectural design, engineering and financial assistance required to build the bridge.

Read more:
https://sites.google.com/site/hattenciity/latest-new-blog/phase1launchofelementsmallandprelaunchofsilverscapeservicedresidences

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Malacca Strait Bridge

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malacca_Strait_Bridge

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2 Responses to The Strait of Malacca Bridge: A bridge too far?

  1. Peter RAMANATHAN Pillay says:

    All heard were negative feedbacks. What about the positive side of all negative. If there is bad then there is good, if there are dreams and there’s bound to be hope.

  2. Lee Mei Ling says:

    I read an article posted sometime last year written by two Malaysians. They are suppose to be in the field of Maritime Services and the other from a lecturer with a Malaysian University. Their views were somewhat one sided and some of their comments in there were actually extracted from other articles published by experts in their own field. Some paragraphs were taken out of context from many published articles and only the negative aspect was made known.

    Every coin has two sides. It all depends on which side you favor most. If you are against the development, then you can only see the negative aspect.
    I remember back in the 80’s when Malaysia wanted to connect Penang to the mainland, there were lots of negative feedback and protests and now they are building a second one.

    One can only see if one opens his eyes. Everyone has an opinion but to twist paragraphs from articles published by others and making it look like they know what they are talking about, is something else. What the two authors have done was simply fabricating what they want others to believe. Some readers will believe what they read because of their credentials listed down.

    Open your mind and make way for progress. It’s a borderless region now everywhere, move on with progress.

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